INDICATORS DESCRIPTION

INDICATORS DESCRIPTION

DIMENSION: 1. KEY INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES

This lists provides the title, name and description of each indicator, as well as the evidences asked to the universities to present when responding the questionnare of standards.

SUBDIMENSION: 1.1. Accessibility

INDICATOR: 1. Accessible buildings and spaces

Buildings and spaces are physically and sensory accessible

Description of the indicator: This indicator checks if the university buildings and spaces are physically and sensory accessible as these concepts are defined in the Glossary. It is mandatory to attach an accessibility report from the department or person responsible for university infrastructure. Optionally, graphic documentation or the results of the evaluation surveys could be added.

 

INDICATOR: 2. Cognitively accessible buildings and spaces

 

Easy-to-read formats are used in all campus facilities. Signage, signs and maps are designed for all persons (plain language, infographics, and icons).

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator is similar to the first one, but focusses on cognitive accessibility as defined in the Glossary. A report from the University Accessibility Department or entity in charge must be attached as evidence. Optionally, other evidences could be added, for instance: graphic documentation, evaluation surveys completed by students or the university’s risk and emergency management plan.

 

INDICATOR: 3. Accessible transportation      

 

Transportation to access the university campus is accessible.

 

Description of the indicator: The third indicator checks if the transportation that provides access to the campus is accessible, as accessibility is defined in the Glossary. For that purpose, it assesses if public transportation is accessible, if the university offers adapted transportation services to all students who need them (if not available by other means) and if it meets the mobility needs of students with disabilities. As an evidence, a report from the service responsible for organizing the mobility of students with disabilities and the chart of services of the unit or service responsible for the transport system must be attached. Other evidences could be reports on transportation accessibility, graphic documentation, or evaluation surveys.

 

INDICATOR: 4. Digital accessibility

Websites, digital learning platforms and mobile apps are accessible. Conformance with Double A universal accessibility standards must be considered. Registration forms for enrolment and access to certain university services are accessible.

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator is used to register the digital accessibility level regarding the European regulation: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/PT/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32016L2102. It marks if the websites, digital learning platforms and mobile applications are accessible according to the Double A universal accessibility standards, including the registration forms for enrolment and access to certain university services. It also considers if the university has a system to control the accessibility of all digital content. Links to registration forms or to information on the curricula and courses offered would serve as evidences. The evaluation surveys and easy-to-read scientific dissemination publications could be other evidences.

 

INDICATOR: 5. Supportive resources for students with disabilities

The university has supportive resources to promote the autonomy and self-determination of students with disabilities.

Description of the indicator: This indicator checks if the university offers support resources to promote autonomy and self-determination among students with disability, such as personal assistance service, sign language interpreter service and assistive devices. As a mandatory evidence, it must be attached the chart of services of the unit, service or office serving students with disabilities or the accessibility office. Other evidences could be the annual report or the evaluation survey, for example.

 

SUBDIMENSION: 1.2. Normative and operational framework

 

INDICATOR: 6. The university has specific regulations or guidelines to ensure that the needs of students with disabilities are catered for

Description of the indicator: As its name suggests, this indicator registers if the university has specific regulations or guidelines to ensure that the university meets the needs of the students with disabilities, checking for this purpose if it has a budget available to execute the settled measures. Some examples of evidences are the university regulations and the report of the service unit on the implementation of regulations.

 

INDICATOR: 7. Plan for the inclusion of students with disabilities

The university has a comprehensive inclusion plan for students with disabilities with specific actions in all areas of university life

Description of the indicator: This indicator points whether the institution has a comprehensive inclusion plan (as defined in the Glossary) for students with disabilities with specific actions in all areas of university life. In addition, it checks if this plan has an associated budget, if the European regulation EN 17161: 2019 is followed and if there is a monitoring system. One mandatory evidence is the link to the university’s strategic plan for students with disabilities. Other evidences could be a report of the office that service students with disabilities on the implementation of the plan or the existence of an advisory body responsible, for instance.

 

 

 

INDICATOR: 8. Student service protocol

The university has a service and support protocol to respond to the needs of students with disabilities (interviews with technicians, provision of resources, monitoring, information to teaching staff, specialised support in administrative offices, etc.)

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator checks if the university has a service and support protocol to respond to the needs of students with disabilities (interviews with technicians, provision of resources, monitoring, information to teaching staff, specialized support in administrative offices, etc.) and in which level it provides an individualized and flexible care. A link to the protocol must be added; other examples of evidences are the annual report from the relevant office/service on the demands and responses to support needs, the satisfaction surveys and the documentation showing the process carried out to meet the needs of the students.

 

INDICATOR: 9. Coordination between services and resources

The university has a system for coordination between the different university services in order to offer comprehensive support to respond to the needs of students with disabilities, including coordination with colleges and schools

 

Description of the indicator: With this indicator, it is noted whether the university has a system for coordination between the different university services to offer comprehensive support to respond to the needs of students with disabilities. Some possible evidences are: strategic inclusion plans, protocols for coordination between services, a report from the service responsible for coordination between services and departments on the actions carried out, a link or information about the unit or service that coordinates the different services and departments and the existence of an advisory body responsible for coordination.

 

 

INDICATOR: 10. Disability office, unit or services

The university has an office, unit or service (or a point of contact for information for students with disabilities) to provide care and support to students with disabilities

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator registers if the university has an office, unit or service to provide care and support to students with disabilities and whether it is staffed by administrative and technical personnel who are specialized and qualified in the inclusion of people with disabilities. It is mandatory to provide the office website or contact.

 

INDICATOR: 11. Tuition and fee waivers

The university offers students with disabilities financial assistance for tuition and other fees in accordance with internal or country regulations

 

Description of the indicator: The indicator number 11 evaluates if the students with disabilities have any kind of financial assistance for tuition and other fees in accordance with internal or state regulations. As an evidence, the university regulations related to positive actions regarding fees and prices for students with disabilities must be attached.

 

SUBDIMENSION: 1.3. Training and awareness

 

 

INDICATOR: 12. Community awareness

The university conducts awareness-raising activities regarding the inclusion of persons with disabilities and universal design aimed at the entire university community.

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator registers whether the university conducts awareness-raising activities regarding the inclusion of persons with disabilities aimed at the entire university community. The report, programs or links to websites on annual awareness-raising activities aimed at the university community would serve as evidences.

 

 

 

INDICATOR: 13. Teaching staff training and innovation

The university offers continuing professional development, teaching innovation programmes and teacher networks, regarding the inclusion of people with disabilities and universal design for learning.

 

Description of the indicator: This indicators aim is to note if the university offers to the teaching staff specific training related to inclusion and Universal Design for Learning. This may happen as continuing professional development, teaching innovation programs or teaching networks. It is mandatory to send a link or document with information about training and/or innovation programs. Other possible evidences are information on teacher networks regarding these subjects or on training actions on universal design for learning, training programs on inclusive methodologies or teaching innovation projects and their resources related to the Tutoring Action Plan.

 

 

INDICATOR: 14. Training and guidance for administrative, technical and service personnel  

The university offers training and guidance for administrative, technical and service personnel on catering for diversity and special needs in the university activities.

 

Description of the indicator: The indicator 14 is similar to the previous ones, but it refers to the administrative, technical and service personnel instead of teaching staff. As evidence, it must be added documentation or link to information on the specific courses administered annually. Other possible evidence is the orientation and e-learning tools available for teacher or other staff members.

 

DIMENSION: 2. ACCESS

 

INDICATOR: 15. Transition and induction programmes

The university runs transition programmes from secondary to university education and has an induction plan for all new students that is accessible for students with disabilities

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator’s aim is to register whether the transition programs from secondary to university education (summer academic programs and meetings, open days, orientation on higher education, peer mentoring programs) and induction plan (welcome week, orientation days, etc.) are accessible for students with disabilities, either there are specific programs and plans aimed to students with disabilities. The link to information on induction and transition programs with a description of the activities must be provided. An example of optional evidence is the assessment of transition programs and induction plans by students with disabilities.

 

INDICATOR: 16. Accessible admission tests

The university admission test, as well as the admission tests to all other university study programs, have been designed in an accessible format, and the university provides reasonable accommodations and resources as required by persons with disabilities.

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator assess if the university admission tests to any university study program are accessible, this includes that they have been designed in an accessible format and that the university provides reasonable accommodations and resources as required. The existing university regulations on this issue must be attached or linked as an evidence. Other evidences could be a report from the relevant service on the accommodations made, the number of students who required them or the satisfaction surveys results.

 

INDICATOR: 17. Reserved quota

The university has a reserved quota for new students with disabilities

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator registers if the university has a reserved quota for new students with disabilities and whether it is usually filled. This quota may depend on the national legislation or on the internal regulation. If the answer is yes, the percentage and number of reserved places must be informed.

INDICATOR: 18. Information on students with disabilities enrolled

The university includes the variable ‚Äúdisability‚ÄĚ in its system of information on students enrolled at all levels of university studies

 

Description of the indicator: The indicator 18 checks if the university officially registers the enrolled students with disabilities. If so, an evidence must be provided, as well as the percentage by educational level, ages and sex. A report on this subject could be also attached.

 

DIMENSION: 3. UNIVERSITY LIFE

 

SUBDIMENSION: 3.1. Learning and Education

 

INDICATOR: 19. Accessible content and materials

The content, resources and materials used for teaching and learning are accessible

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator checks if the content, resources and materials used for teaching and learning are accessible. For this purpose, it checks if the teaching staff is provided with guidelines for the development of accessible content and materials and if the learning environments and platforms allow for the use of different formats. It also registers if there is a control or monitoring system of the accessibility of teaching documents, materials and resources. Some possible evidences are: the appointed guidelines (mandatory), the information from the platforms with the different options, a satisfaction survey of students, the control system of the accessibility and the data on the number of teachers who value the materials positively.

 

INDICATOR: 20. Inclusive methodologies

The university encourages teaching staff to use systems, tools and methodologies that facilitate the participation and learning of all students, in accordance with the provisions of the Universal Design framework.

 

Description of indicators: The indicator number 20 monitors whether the university encourages teaching staff to use systems, tools and methodologies that facilitate the participation and learning of all students, in accordance with the provisions of the Universal Design framework. Concretely, it checks if the university promotes the use of methodologies with this aim, such as the cooperative learning or peer tutoring; if the teaching staff is guided to make reasonable accommodations to meet specific needs; if the university has tools to ensure the participation of all students and if the teaching staff is trained to use them. It is mandatory to attach the link to the chart of services that provide guidelines to teachers for making reasonable accommodations. Other possible evidences would be training plans, guidelines, snapshots of teaching toolkit, evaluation surveys or the system used by the university to verify that teaching practices conform to Universal Design principles.

 

INDICATOR: 21. Inclusive assessment systems

The university offers diverse assessment methods (formats, techniques, times, etc.) that ensure equal opportunities and evaluation criteria for students with disabilities. Teaching guides contain specific information on evaluation systems to meet individual student needs

 

Description of the indicators: With this indicator, it is registered if the university offers diverse assessment methods that ensure equal opportunities for students with disabilities, as well as if the teaching guides contain specific information on evaluation systems to meet individual student needs. Some possible evidences are teaching guide samples, evaluation or assessment templates, university standards or satisfaction surveys of students with disabilities.

 

INDICATOR: 22. Counselling service

The university has a counselling service for all students, including students with disabilities, to support their learning process (e.g., study techniques, social skills, etc)

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator checks if the university has a counselling service for all students, including those with disabilities, to support their learning process (like study techniques or social skills, for example). If so, it is mandatory to provide the link to the learning and education counselling service site. The satisfaction survey of students with disabilities regarding the support received would be possible evidences, too.

 

 

INDICATOR: 23. Orientation plan and personalised tutoring

The university has a Tutoring Action Plan (implemented by teachers) that offers personalized support to all students, including students with disabilities.

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator assesses if the university has a Tutoring Action Plan whereby teachers offer personalized support to all students, including those with disabilities. Would serve as evidence: regulations concerning the Tutoring Action Plan, examples of the guidance provided in its context, a personalized study plan or a satisfaction survey of students on this plan.

 

INDICATOR: 24. Peer support systems

The university runs peer support programmes for students aimed at facilitating learning and promoting the well-being of all students, including students with disabilities. These programmes include training, evaluation, monitoring and formal recognition (mentors, peer support, volunteers)

 

Description of the indicator: The indicator number 24 registers whether the university runs peer support programs aimed at facilitating learning and promoting the well-being of all students, including students with disabilities. These programs might be mentoring programs, peer support programs or volunteering programs and must include training, evaluation, monitoring and recognition. Links to the existing programs information must be added. Satisfaction surveys would also work as evidences.

 

INDICATOR: 25. Participation in cultural and university extension activities

The university offers cultural and university extension activities (such as drama, dance or art exhibitions) that are accessible for all students, thus guaranteeing the participation of all students regardless of their abilities.

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator pays attention to whether these activities (such as drama, dance or art exhibitions) offered by the university are accessible for all students, regardless if they have a disability or not. As an evidence, the program of accessible activities must be attached or linked. The satisfaction survey or reports indicating the accessibility of the scheduled activities would serve as evidences, too.

 

SUBDIMENSION: 3.2. Participation

 

INDICATOR: 26. Participation of students with disabilities in university bodies and student associations

The university encourages students, including students with disabilities, to participate in the different governing bodies, university representation entities and student associations. There are protocols and actions to encourage the participation of students with disabilities

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator checks if students, including students with disability, are encouraged to participate in the different governing bodies, university representation entities and student associations. Also, if there are protocols and actions to encourage the participation of students with disabilities specifically. Attach as evidence documentation or guidelines showing how students are encouraged and motivated.

 

INDICATOR: 27. Physical activity and sports

The university implements specific measures and other inclusion policies to promote physical activity and sports practice for students with disabilities

 

Description of the indicator: The indicator number 27 assess if the university implements specific measure to promote physical activity and sports practice for students with disabilities. It also registers if it has staff trained in adapted physical activities and/or resources to develop these activities. It is a mandatory evidence the link to the information about the physical activities and adapted sporting activities. The satisfaction surveys and pointing the concrete adaptative equipment measures and inclusion policies would also be evidences.

 

 

INDICATOR: 28. Protocols for the prevention of harassment in the university community

There are protocols for the prevention of harassment in the university community, with a special focus on people with disabilities. Intervention, mediation, and follow-up systems are in place

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator registers whether these protocols exist in the university and whether they have a special focus on people with disabilities. Also, if there are intervention, mediation and follow-up systems. The protocols and satisfaction surveys could be provided as evidences.

 

SUBDIMENSION: 3.3. Internships

 

INDICATOR: 29. External internships

The university offers external internships that are accessible to all students. There are support and advisory systems for students with disabilities to participate in internships outside the university. The university has support and advisory systems for hosting organisations in relation to students with disabilities

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator checks if the university offers external internships that are accessible to all students and if there are support and advisory systems for the students and for the hosting organizations in relation to students with disabilities. It is mandatory to provide documents or examples of university guidelines to hosting organizations and the link to the service or resource if it exists. Examples of other evidences are: satisfaction surveys of students and hosting organizations, people or services that provide support and advise, and the list of accessible businesses and centers for internships.

 

SUBDIMENSION: 3.4. Research

 

INDICATOR: 30. Research and PhD program

The university offers scholarships and grants for university students with disabilities applying for doctorate and/or research programmes. The university has teams or groups engaged in research in the field of inclusion, accessibility and the rights of persons with disabilities. The university conducts knowledge transfer projects on inclusion and the wellbeing of persons with disabilities.

 

Description of the indicator: With this indicator, three points are assessed: whether the university offers scholarships and grants specifically for university students with disabilities applying for doctorate and/or research programs, if it has research teams or groups engaged in the field of inclusion, accessibility and the rights of people with disabilities, and if it conducts knowledge transfer projects on inclusion and wellbeing on these people. If so, the university internal regulation where the reserved quotas, scholarships or grants appear. The number of grants and the number of students with disabilities engaged in these programs will also be accepted as evidences.

 

 

INDICATOR: 31. Teaching and research staff with disabilities

The university has reserved quotas for the access of persons with disabilities to teaching and/or researcher positions. The university offers support measures for teaching and research staff with disabilities

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator checks if the university has reserved quotas for the access of persons with disabilities to teaching and/or researcher positions and whether it offers support measures for them once they are in the position. The employment offer(s) or the support protocol or measures would serve as evidences.

 

SUBDIMENSION: 3.5. International mobility

 

INDICATOR: 32. Participation in mobility programmes

The university offers activities and takes steps to guarantee and encourage the participation of students with disabilities in international mobility programmes.

The university runs information and orientation services for students with disabilities about mobility programmes and the opportunities open to them

 

Description of the indicator: With this indicator, it is noted if the university encourage the participation of students with disability in these programs and if they are provided with information and orientation for that. As a mandatory evidence a list and description of the programs and/or action developed must be added. Other evidences would be the satisfaction surveys, the number of participating students, the supports offered by the university and the awareness actions led by student associations.

 

INDICATOR: 33. Mobility grants and support resources

The university offers complementary grants to support the international mobility of students with disability and provides them with the support services they need to take part in mobility programs

 

Description of the indicator: To complement the indicator above, this one notes if the university offers complementary grants and provides support services to support the international mobility of students with disability. The number of existing grants (with a link to the information about them) and the description of the resources must be provided, as well as the support actions to find accommodation. Once more, the satisfaction surveys will be valid evidences.

 

INDICATOR: 34. Inclusion of international students in mobility programmes

The university welcomes students with disabilities from other international universities and offers support services, including reasonable accommodations.

 

Description of the evidence: This other indicator pays attention to whether the university host international students with disability and if it offers to them the support services they require, including reasonable accommodations. Must be provided as evidence: the student associations that offer information and support to mobility students (if there are); the procedure for the induction of new students and the chart of specific support services provided to students with disabilities. The list of students with disabilities from other countries and their satisfaction surveys would be accepted as evidences.

 

 

INDICATOR: 35. Events for international students in mobility programs

The university and the student associations organize accessible events and take into consideration the needs of international students with disabilities for the development of university extension, cultural and leisure activities

 

Description of the indicator: In a similar way to the indicator 34, this one notes if the university extension, cultural and leisure activities leaded by student associations are accessible and if they keep in mind the mobility students with disability in their program. It is mandatory to provide the link to information on events and support actions provided by the university to student associations that supports this mobility process. Also, the satisfaction surveys would serve as evidences.

 

DIMENSION: 4. GRADUATION

 

INDICATOR: 36. Career orientation and information services

The university has, and offers to students with disabilities, information, orientation and advisory services on training and career opportunities. The university provides students with the necessary support and experience to find and keep a job

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator assesses if the university offers these services to students with disability specifically and if it provides them with the support, experience and job tutors and mentors needed to find and keep a job. The link to the service, unit or website where this information is offered and the employment programs accessible to students with disabilities must be provided.

 

INDICATOR: 37. Specific programs to promote employment for students with disabilities

The university arranges and offers specific services and programs to improve employability and employment support for people with disabilities and informs them of their employment rights.

The university partners with companies and institutions to encourage training and employment offers for persons with disabilities

 

Description of the indicator: The indicator number 37 notes whether the university offers these kind of programs specifically to students with disability and whether it informs them of their employment rights, as well as whether it makes partnerships with companies and institutions to encourage training and employment offers for persons with disabilities. It is mandatory to provide a link to the list of employment programs and services and a list of companies participating in the programs. Other evidences would be the agreement with companies that receive students with disabilities, the satisfaction surveys and the number of students participating in internships with hosting companies, for instance.

 

 

INDICATOR: 38. Graduate follow-up

The university has a follow-up system of graduates with disabilities and measures their employment rate in compliance with the National Data Protection Law

 

Description of the indicator: This indicator checks if the university has a follow-up system of graduated with disabilities and measures their employment rate. The information on the monitoring system or official university data on graduates with disabilities and their employment level would be accepted as evidences.

 

Glossary

 

The following intends to explain concepts included in the standards, and thus guarantee that each indicator is well understood and adequately answered by the institutions that choose to use this tool.

General Concepts

First, we define the broad general concepts that are the framework of this document.

Disability

Disability is an evolving concept and results from the interaction between persons with impairments and attitudinal and environmental barriers that hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others.

The CRPD does not provide a definition of disability however, in article 2 it describes that persons with disabilities include those who have long-term physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments, which in interaction with various barriers may hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others.[1]

Inclusion

In terms of education, inclusion is a process that ensures full participation and access to quality learning opportunities for all children, young people and adults, respecting and valuing diversity, and eliminating all forms of discrimination in and through education. The term inclusion represents a commitment to making preschools, schools, and other education settings, places in which everyone is valued and belongs, and diversity is seen as enriching.

Inclusive education is the result of the social model of disability articulated from a human rights perspective. It involves:

    • Reasonable accommodations made to meet the different educational needs of different children
    • All persons have equal access
    • Accessibility
    • Person-centred[2],[3]

Universal design

The design of products, environments, programmes and services to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. ‚ÄúUniversal design‚ÄĚ shall not exclude assistive devices for particular groups of persons with disabilities where this is needed.[4]

Universal design for learning (UDL)

UDL is a set of principles, providing teachers and other staff with a structure to create adaptable learning environments and develop instruction to meet the diverse needs of all learners. It recognizes that each student learns in a unique manner and involves developing flexible ways to learn: creating an engaging classroom environment; maintaining high expectations for all students, while allowing multiple ways to meet expectations; empowering teachers to think differently about their own teaching; and focusing on educational outcomes for all, including those with disabilities. Curricula must be conceived, designed and applied to meet and adjust to the requirements of every student, and providing appropriate educational responses. Standardised assessments must be replaced by flexible and multiple forms of assessments and recognition of individual progress towards broad goals that provide alternative routes for learning.[5]

Accessibility

It is a precondition for persons with disabilities to live independently and participate fully and equally in society, including the Higher Education community.

Accessibility must be addressed in all its dimensions, encompassing:

      • physical environment;
      • transportation;
      • information and communication, including information and communication technologies;
      • learning materials, e.g., Braille and audiobooks; Sign language resources; etc.;
      • other facilities and services open or provided to the whole community.

*Changes to the accessibility of physical environments, curriculum adaptations or teacher training, will make it possible to monitor the progress of the transformation.[6]

Support

To guarantee the development of the full potential of people with disabilities in education, the system must offer resources and support to make their inclusion and their learning progress effective. Supports include products and technical aids, personal assistants, scholarships and financial resources, counsellors, curricular adaptations, etc.

  • The need for assistance and support can fluctuate, depending on environmental factors, the stage of life, the underlying health conditions, and the level of individual functioning.
    • Learning support: Assistive products; Individual learning plans; Individual support, personal assistants.
  • Curricula must be conceived, designed and implemented in such a way as to meet and adjust to the requirements of every student, and provide appropriate educational responses. Standardized assessments must be replaced with flexible and multiple forms of assessments and the recognition of individual progress towards broad goals that provide alternative routes for learning.[7]
    • Accessible admission tests: they must respond to individual needs. The Higher Education Institution must take measures such as an adaptation of the time available to the student, the organization of tests from home, or the possibility of having audio materials, among others.
  • With appropriate teaching methodologies, support and accommodations; all curricula can be adapted to meet the needs of all students, including those with disabilities. Inclusive student assessment systems can be strengthened through a system of individualized supports.[8]
  • Peer support refers to support from a person who has knowledge from their own experiences. According to UNESCO, Schools should have peer support groups to allow children, adolescents and adults with disabilities to share their ideas and concerns with one another.[9]
    • ‚ÄúPeer supported schemes within higher education institutions draw on elements of instruction, coaching and mentoring. In contrast to coaching or instructing, peer support does not require the supporting 'peer' to have more years of experience, just experience in the area of activity which the developing peer needs.‚ÄĚ[10]
    • ‚ÄúPeer Supported Development Scheme (PSDS). It provides a cross-institutional framework to enable constructive dialogue to develop teaching and learning in order to further the student experience and enable staff to continue their professional development.‚ÄĚ[11]

According to the Committee on the Rights of Disability, States parties must recognize that individual support and reasonable accommodation are priority matters and should be free of charge at all compulsory levels of education

Indicators vocabulary

A glossary of the terms that appear in the different indicators is presented below, in the order in which they are mentioned in the document:

Physical accessibility (Indicator 1)

Aims at providing a barrier-free environment for the independence, convenience and safety of all people with disabilities. Including but not limited to wheelchair users and people with limited walking abilities or reduced mobility.

The barriers may be found in signage, pathways inside the campus, curb ramps, pedestrian crossings, parking, etc.

Physical accessibility of vertical and horizontal access in both new and existing constructions encompass ramps, elevators, platform lifts, stairs, railings and handrails, entrances, vestibules, doors, corridors and restrooms.

For old existing buildings, at least one entrance per facility should be accessible to a wheelchair user. For new buildings, the accessible entrance(s) should be the main entrance(s) intended for use by the public.

All teaching, administrative and common areas should be accessible to a wheelchair user and people with reduced mobility.

Suitable arrangements should be made for stepped lecture halls or auditoriums.

At least one accessible unisex restroom should be provided in each building other than student dormitories and residential accommodations.

All recreational facilities should be usable by persons with disabilities, to the extent possible.

All library facilities and equipment should be accessible.

Sports halls should be as accessible as possible to a wheelchair user and people with reduced mobility.

At least one shower room, one restroom and one changing room per facility should be accessible to a wheelchair user or people with reduced mobility.

Spectators' seating areas should be provided for wheelchair users and some seats should be reserved for people with reduced mobility.

All public areas inside Campus such as banks, shops, waiting areas, customs areas, inquiry offices, etc. should be accessible to a wheelchair user, and people with reduced mobility wherever possible.[12]

Sensory accessibility (Ind. 1)

Different types of sensory impairments affect one or more senses, sight, hearing, smell, touch, taste or spatial awareness.

Sensory disabilities could involve autism spectrum disorder (ASD); blindness and low vision; hearing loss and deafness and sensory processing disorder. Sensory accessibility includes but is not limited to high contrast, dyslexic fonts and larger text, texts in braille, tactile marks, textural changes in the footpath, floors and signs, colours and contrasts, audio induction loop, subtitling or captioning, light signals, sign language interpreters.[13]

Cognitive accessibility (Ind. 2)

 Accessible information, especially for persons with learning disabilities. It could be manifested in different formats, such as easy to read and plain language. Easy read is information, which is written using simple words supported by images. Easy to read formats aims to be easier to understand than standard documents, mainly for people with a learning disability. It can be useful for other people too, for example, people with low literacy levels and / or English (language of the country providing the assessment) as a second language, people who have had a stroke or people with dementia. The images used to create easy read documents vary, for example, photographs, drawings or symbols. Different people are used to different styles of easy read, in different sectors and use of different easy read providers.

Easy read will help some people to read information independently and can help people to remember information from the conversation. The images should support people to understand the text.

Simple text is the basis for easy read. Not everyone with a learning disability wants easy to read. For example, some autistic people might find images distracting.[14]

Digital accessibility (Ind. 4)

Digital accessibility should be understood as principles and techniques to be observed when designing, constructing, maintaining, and updating websites, mobile applications and virtual contents so that they can be used by people with disabilities.

The four principles of accessibility are: perceivability, meaning that information and user interface components must be presentable to users in ways they can perceive; operability, meaning that user interface components and navigation must be operable; understandability, meaning that information and the operation of the user interface must be understandable; and robustness, meaning that content must be robust enough to be interpreted reliably by a wide variety of user agents, including assistive technologies.[15]

Digital accessibility implies, for example, that people with disabilities can navigate the network with their support instruments (voice reading, subtitling, sign language, color contrast, and easy reading).

Support resources (Ind. 5 and 33)

Resources available to students with disabilities. These can be support staff, such as personal assistants or interpreters, support products such as magnifying glasses, software, assistive technologies, or other tools or services. Any support measures provided must be compliant with the goal of inclusion. Accordingly, they must be designed to strengthen opportunities for students with disabilities to participate in the classroom and in out-of-school activities alongside their peers.[16]

Regulations (Ind. 6)

Guidelines to guarantee attention to the needs of students with disabilities, whether they are the university own regulations, national, European or international. They could include directives, laws, decrees, regulations, plans, instructions, etc.

Comprehensive Inclusion Plan (Indicator 7)

Document containing measures and actions aimed at guaranteeing the rights of people with disabilities in all the university community. They are usually approved by the governing body of the university or another government body. Universities must have a specific plan for students with disabilities, which organizes, directs, and gives coherence to the supports and all forms of assistance that the university must make available to these students to ensure their educational inclusion.[17]

Student service protocol (Indicator 8)

Procedure which details the way in which services are provided to students with disabilities in order to unify criteria for action. It combines flexibility and attention to the particularity of each student, with a certain systematization in the guidelines and criteria adopted. This process could involve some of the following steps or activities: initial contact, information gathering, interviews, needs assessment, development and specification of action guidelines, intervention, curricular and evaluation adaptations, follow-up, etc.[18]

System for coordination (Ind. 9)

The university has established processes and systematized mechanisms for the coordination between the different schools, faculties, and services to facilitate the university life of students with disabilities according to their characteristics.

Teaching innovation programmes (Ind. 13)

Programs developed by universities that promote and accompany the use of innovative practices in the classroom. We understand by innovative practices the use of multi-faceted and lively teaching methods and diversified and rich content to stimulate students’ inner interest in learning, thus, developing positive student attitudes toward proactive learning and enhancing students’ learning ability.[19]

Teacher networks (Ind. 13)

Approaches to teacher professional development have shifted from a top-down focus on individual improvement to bottom-up approach involving collaboration and group inquiry. In this context, teacher networks emerge as a web of relationships through which information, resources and support is exchanged. These networks are constituted as communities of active collaboration, in which practices, resources, materials, experiences and training are exchanged.[20]

Inclusive education requires a support and resource system for teachers in educational institutions at all levels. This might include partnerships within the university or with other universities, promoting collaborative practice including team teaching, study groups, joint student assessment processes, peer support and exchange visits.[21]

Admission test (Ind. 16)

Entrance examinations measure knowledge and aptitudes in certain subjects, relevant for the program, and may be considered with other factors in the admission process.[22] These tests must be accessible for students with disabilities offering diverse assessment methods and formats.

Reasonable accommodation[23] (Ind. 20 and 34)

Necessary and appropriate modification and adjustments not imposing a disproportionate or undue burden, where needed in a particular case, to ensure to persons with disabilities the enjoyment or exercise on an equal basis with others of all human rights and fundamental freedoms, including their right to education.

Elements:

  • Is of immediate realization
  • Applies in individual cases
  • Applies upon request of a person with disability
  • Implies an objective reasonableness test

Accessibility is related to groups, whereas reasonable accommodation is related to individuals. This means that the duty to provide accessibility is an ex-ante duty.

The duty to provide reasonable accommodation is an ex nunc duty, which means that it is enforceable from the moment an individual with an impairment needs it in a given situation. A person with a rare impairment might ask for accommodation that falls outside the scope of any accessibility standard.[24]

 

Reasonable accommodations in the educational field may involve methodological and curricular adaptations, support and changes in the evaluation systems, among others.

Teaching guides (Ind. 21)

Guide for each course in which practical aspects, competencies and learning results, objectives, contents, references, methodology, evaluation systems and an indicative timetable are specified. These guides must be available and accessible for all students.

Counselling service (Ind. 22)

Service aimed at students that provides both information and support in the learning process through study techniques, adaptation of materials, training in social skills, etc. In the case of students with disabilities, this service must offer adequate information on support resources.

Tutoring action plan (Ind. 23)

Institutions should ensure that the resources available for the support of student learning are adequate and appropriate for each program offered. In addition to their teachers, students have a range of resources to help them in their learning. Among these resources is the human support in the form of tutors.[25]

The Tutoring Action Plan is the institutional document that makes explicit the organization of the orientation and tutorials of a center, a faculty or a degree. More specifically, the Tutorial Action Plan must include actions aimed at adapting students to the institution; guiding the development of transversal and specific competences; making possible the autonomy, individual initiative and self-knowledge of each student; improving academic performance, integration and climate; informing and guiding about professional opportunities and promoting the transition to active life.[26]

In Spain and other countries students have the right to receive personalized guidance and tutoring in the first year and during studies, to facilitate adaptation to the university environment and academic performance, as well as in the final phase in order to facilitate employment, professional development and the continuity of education.[27]

University extension activities (Ind. 25)

These are extracurricular activities that allow the university to connect with society. They imply a transfer of knowledge and the development of cultural, sports and leisure activities.

University extension activities are part of an educational, cultural and scientific process that articulates, extends, develops and feeds Education and Research and enables the articulation of the ever-evolving relationship between the university and society.[28] In order to ensure inclusion, these activities must be accessible to people with disabilities.

Guidelines for the participation of students with disabilities in university bodies (Ind 26)

Set of guidelines, often organized in a guide to foster participation of students with disabilities in students’ associations, and/or other managing bodies of the Higher Education Institution. In some universities there are guides to promote diversity and the inclusion of people with disabilities in different university bodies.

Inclusive physical activities (Ind. 27)

Are those that allow people with disabilities to carry out physical activities an equal basis with others, in the same context and, under the same rules.

Adapted physical activities (Ind. 27)

Are those that allow people with disabilities to carry out physical activities by making adaptations in material, spaces and regulations.

The difference is that the former allows people with disabilities to practice in inclusive settings, while the latter are designed only for people with disabilities.

Some examples of adapted activities would be wheelchair basketball and wheelchair rugby. However, there are modalities of basketball or inclusive rugby whose teams are made up of people with and without disabilities.

Support staff (Ind. 33)

According to article 24 of the CRPD[29], States must provide the necessary support to guarantee the education of persons with disabilities in the regular system. This obligation includes making support staff available for people with disabilities who need it, such as integrative teachers, pedagogical peers, support teachers, therapeutic companions, support aides, non-teaching personal companions, personal assistants, sign language interpreters, among others.

 

 

[1] UN General Assembly, Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: resolution adopted by the General Assembly, 24 January 2007, A/RES/61/106. Article

https://www.refworld.org/docid/45f973632.htm

[2] UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), General comment No. 4 (2016), Article 24: Right to inclusive education, 2 September 2016, CRPD/C/GC/4.  https://www.refworld.org/docid/57c977e34.html

[3] UNESCO. Cali commitment to equity and inclusion in education (2019, September 11-13) International Forum on Inclusion and Equity in Education, Cali, Colombia.  https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000370910.locale=en

UN General Assembly, Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: resolution adopted by the General Assembly, 24 January 2007, A/RES/61/106. Article 2.            https://www.refworld.org/docid/45f973632.htm

[5] UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), General comment No. 4 (2016), Article 24: Right to inclusive education, 2 September 2016, CRPD/C/GC/4.  https://www.refworld.org/docid/57c977e34.html

[6] UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). General comment No. 2. (2016) Article 9: accessibility, 25 November 2016, CRPD/C/GC/.

https://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G14/033/13/PDF/G1403313.pdf?OpenElement

[9] UNESCO (2009) Towards Inclusive Education for Children with Disabilities: A Guideline.      https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000192480?posInSet=1&queryId=c7dbc73b-c244-4f17-a957-3bf6e51f83b6

[10] Monk, C., y Purnell, L. (2014). What constitutes' peer support ‚Äėwithin peer supported development? Journal of pedagogic development. 4 (1), 38-47.

[11] Purnell, L., y Monk, C. (2012). Embedding a peer-supported development scheme: overcoming challenges in engaging staff and students in continuing professional development. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 46. 3830 ‚Äď 3836. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2012.06.155

[12] United Nations (2012). Accessibility for the disabled-A design manual for a barrier Free environment. https://www.un.org/esa/socdev/enable/designm

[13] Ibid.

[14] NHS England (2018) Guide to making information accessible for people with a learning disability. https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/guide-to-making-information-accessible-for-people-with-a-learning-disability

[15] Directive (EU) 2018/1972. European Electronic Communications Code. December 11, 2018. https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A32018L1972

[16] UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), General comment No. 4 (2016), Article 24: Right to inclusive education, 2 September 2016, CRPD/C/GC/4.  https://www.refworld.org/docid/57c977e34.html

[17] Bueno, L. C. P. (2016). Gu√≠a para la elaboraci√≥n de un ¬ęPlan de acci√≥n al estudiantado con discapacidad en la universidad¬Ľ. La Cuesti√≥n Universitaria, 6, 103-116.

[18] Escorza Pi√Īa, S. (2011). Protocolo de atenci√≥n a personas con discapacidad en la Universidad. RIUMA

http://hdl.handle.net/10630/4672

[20] Baker-Doyle, K. J. (2015). No teacher is an island: How social networks shape teacher quality. In Lentendre, G. & Wiseman A., Promoting and sustaining a quality teacher workforce (367-383) Emerald Group Publishing Limited. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1479-367920140000027005

[21] UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), General comment No. 4 (2016), Article 24: Right to inclusive education, 2 September 2016, CRPD/C/GC/4.  https://www.refworld.org/docid/57c977e34.html

[22] McGrath, C. H., Henham, M. L., Corbett, A., Durazzi, N., Frearson, M., Janta, B., Kamphuis, W., Katashiro, E., Brankovic, N., Guerin, B., Manville, C., Schwartz, I. y Schweppenstedde, D. (2015). Higher Education Entrance Qualifications and Exams in Europe: A Comparison. European Union. RAND Corporation. https://doi.org/10.7249/RR574

[23] UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). General comment No. 2. (2016) Article 9: accessibility, 25 November 2016, CRPD/C/GC/   
https://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G14/033/13/PDF/G1403313.pdf?OpenElement

[24] Ibid.

[25] European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education (2015) Standards and guidelines for quality assurance in the European Higher Education Area . https://enqa.eu/index.php/home/esg

[26] Universidad de Deusto. Servicio de orientación Universitaria (n.d.) Plan de acción tutorial

https://estudiantes.deusto.es/cs/Satellite/estudiantes/es/plan-accionmtutorial/documento?i=1340196226288

[27] Real Decreto 1791/2010. Estatuto del estudiante universitario. Artículo 8 (2010) https://www.boe.es/buscar/act.php?id=BOE-A-2010-20147

[28] Universidad Federal de Ciencias de la Salud de Porto Alegre (n.d) Extensión universitaria. http://www7.ufcspa.edu.br/index.php/extension-universitaria

[29] UN General Assembly, Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: resolution adopted by the General Assembly, 24 January 2007, A/RES/61/106. Article 24.

https://www.refworld.org/docid/45f973632.htm